Lecture Parfaite

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45 notes

rosesmusings:

Ivan Bilibin.

Seriously some of my favorite art. A few years ago I came across a book of Russian fairy tales at the library with these stunning illustrations and immediately went out and bought a copy of my own.

I also found an older book with a compilation of most of his work at the library. I went back to check it out again, though, and the librarian informed me that they’d dumped it with some other old books that were falling apart, unfortunately. :( The book is pretty expensive and I’ve never quite gotten around to buying it for myself.

(Do check out the Tumblr tag for Ivan Bilibin, though. So much amazing art!)

Filed under Russian Fairy Tales Books

43 notes

theoddmentemporium:

The Brontes invented imaginary realms, and created some of the first fan-fiction.

The Brontë sisters are best known as the authors of literary gothic tales like Wuthering Heights and Jane Eyre, but in their childhood, they worked with their brother to invent the made-up realm of the Glass Town Federation.
According to the British Library, which is featuring the Brontë’s hand-written Glass Town sagas as part of its new exhibition on science fiction, the four Brontë siblings invented the kingdoms of Angria and Gondal, and the capital city of Glass Town. “They became obsessive about their imaginary worlds, drawing maps and creating lives for their characters and featured themselves as the “gods” (“genii”) of their world. Their stories are in tiny micro-script, as if written by their miniature toy soldiers.”
The storytelling started with the toy soldiers and became their own publication, the Young Men’s Magazine, as explained by Branwell Brontë in his book, The History Of The Young Men From Their First Settlement To The Present Time.
Charlotte and Branwell Brontë created the kingdom of Angria with their younger sisters Emily and Anne — but the younger Brontë sisters broke away and created their own kingdom, Gondal, when the older siblings assigned them “inferior parts” in their group storytelling. Originally, these kingdoms were pure made-up fantasy worlds, but over time the Brontë sisters started adding characters from popular fiction and real life. 

Tales of Glass Town, Angria and Gondal on Google Books!

theoddmentemporium:

The Brontes invented imaginary realms, and created some of the first fan-fiction.

The Brontë sisters are best known as the authors of literary gothic tales like Wuthering Heights and Jane Eyre, but in their childhood, they worked with their brother to invent the made-up realm of the Glass Town Federation.

According to the British Library, which is featuring the Brontë’s hand-written Glass Town sagas as part of its new exhibition on science fiction, the four Brontë siblings invented the kingdoms of Angria and Gondal, and the capital city of Glass Town. “They became obsessive about their imaginary worlds, drawing maps and creating lives for their characters and featured themselves as the “gods” (“genii”) of their world. Their stories are in tiny micro-script, as if written by their miniature toy soldiers.”

The storytelling started with the toy soldiers and became their own publication, the Young Men’s Magazine, as explained by Branwell Brontë in his book, The History Of The Young Men From Their First Settlement To The Present Time.

Charlotte and Branwell Brontë created the kingdom of Angria with their younger sisters Emily and Anne — but the younger Brontë sisters broke away and created their own kingdom, Gondal, when the older siblings assigned them “inferior parts” in their group storytelling. Originally, these kingdoms were pure made-up fantasy worlds, but over time the Brontë sisters started adding characters from popular fiction and real life. 

Tales of Glass Town, Angria and Gondal on Google Books!

(via austen12-deactivated20120803)

Filed under Brontë Books Fantasy

309 notes

bookpickings:

Forgotten Bookmarks: A Bookseller’s Collection of Odd Things Lost Between the Pages
From actual bookmarks to photographs, ticket stubs, lists, scribbled recipes, children’s drawings, birth certificates, four-leaf-clovers, unsent love letters, and countless other funny, heartbreaking, and odd ephemera, this scrapbook of intriguing finds by a used bookstore owner Michael Popek opens a rare window into the private lives of anonymous strangers through snippets of their life stories.

bookpickings:

Forgotten Bookmarks: A Bookseller’s Collection of Odd Things Lost Between the Pages

From actual bookmarks to photographs, ticket stubs, lists, scribbled recipes, children’s drawings, birth certificates, four-leaf-clovers, unsent love letters, and countless other funny, heartbreaking, and odd ephemera, this scrapbook of intriguing finds by a used bookstore owner Michael Popek opens a rare window into the private lives of anonymous strangers through snippets of their life stories.

(via libraryland)

Filed under Bookmarks Books Bookseller Collection